Genotropin Pfizer

(5 customer reviews)

$170.00

Buy Genotropin Pfizer Online

Generic Name: somatropin (soe ma TROE pin)
Brand Name: Genotropin, Humatrope, Norditropin FlexPro Pen, Nutropin AQ NuSpin 10, Omnitrope, Saizen, Serostim, Zomacton, Zorbtive

 

Description

Buy Genotropin Pfizer Online

Buy Genotropin Pfizer Online is a form of human growth hormone important for the growth of bones and muscles, Buy HGH Online. Genotropin is used to treat growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, Buy Steroid Hormones Online. This includes people with short stature due to Turner syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, short stature at birth with no catch-up growth, and other causes, Buy Supplements Online. Genotropin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide, Buy Steroids Online.

What Is Genotropin?

Genotropin (somatropin [rDNA origin]) for Injection is a form of human growth hormone used to treat:

  • growth failure in children and adults who lack natural growth hormone, and
  • in those with chronic kidney failure,
  • Noonan syndrome,
  • Turner syndrome,
  • short stature at birth with no catch-up growth,
  • and other causes

Genotropin is also used to:

  • prevent severe weight loss in people with AIDS, or
  • to treat short bowel syndrome

Uses

Various brands of this medication are used for the treatment of one of the following medical conditions: growth failure, growth hormone deficiency, intestinal disorder (short bowel syndrome) or HIV-related weight loss or wasting.

Somatropin is also used to increase height in children with certain disorders (such as Noonan syndrome, Turner syndrome, idiopathic short stature).

How to use Genotropin Cartridge

Read the Patient Information Leaflet that may come with your brand of this medication provided by your pharmacist before you start using somatropin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Some brands of this medication are given by injection into a muscle or under the skin. Some brands may only be injected under the skin. The way you inject this medicine will depend on the brand that you are using. Check with your pharmacist to ensure that the way you are injecting your medicine is correct. It is important to change the location of the injection site to avoid problem areas under the skin. For best results, this medication must be used exactly as prescribed by your doctor. It is important to understand your therapy and to follow your doctor’s instructions closely.

The dosage is based on your age, weight, medical condition and response to treatment.

If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Do not shake while mixing the solution. Shaking makes the medication not work properly. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

If you are using a pen device, do not share your pen device with another person, even if the needle is changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

If this medicine is used for short bowel syndrome, consult your doctor if a special diet (high carbohydrate/low-fat) or the use of nutritional supplements may be helpful.

If this medicine is used for weight loss/muscle wasting, it may take up to 2 weeks to notice the effects of the drug. Do not use more of this medication than prescribed or use it more often since the risk of side effects will be increased.

Genotropin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Serious breathing problems may occur in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome who use Genotropin. If you have Prader-Willi syndrome, call your doctor promptly if you develop signs of lung or breathing problems such as shortness of breath, coughing, or new or increased snoring.

Also call your doctor at once if you have:

  • pain in your knees or hips, walking with a limp;
  • ear pain, swelling, warmth, or drainage;
  • numbness or tingling in your wrist, hand, or fingers;
  • severe swelling or puffiness in your hands and feet;
  • changes in behavior;
  • vision problems, unusual headaches;
  • changes in the shape or size of a mole;
  • pain or swelling in your joints;
  • pancreatitis–severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting;
  • high blood sugar–increased thirst, increased urination, dry mouth, fruity breath odor;
  • increased pressure inside the skull–severe headaches, ringing in your ears, dizziness, nausea, vision problems, pain behind your eyes; or
  • signs of an adrenal gland problem–extreme weakness, severe dizziness, weight loss, changes in skin color, feeling very weak or tired.
  • Common side effects may include:
    • pain, itching, or skin changes where the medicine was injected;
    • swelling, rapid weight gain;
    • muscle or joint pain;
    • numbness or tingling;
    • stomach pain, gas;
    • headache, back pain; or
    • cold or flu symptoms, stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat, ear pain.

Important Safety Information & Indications

Growth hormone should not be used to increase height in children after the growth plates have closed.

Growth hormone should not be used in patients with diabetes who have certain types of diabetic retinopathy (eye problems).

Growth hormone should not be used in patients who have been recently diagnosed with cancer, with cancer, or who are being treated for cancer. Growth hormone deficiency can be caused by brain tumors. So, the presence of these brain tumors should be ruled out before treatment is started. Growth hormone should not be used if it is shown that a previous brain tumor has come back or is getting larger.

Growth hormone should not be used in patients who are critically ill because of surgery, trauma, or respiratory failure.

Growth hormone should not be used in children with Prader-Willi syndrome who are very overweight or have severe breathing problems.

GENOTROPIN should not be used by patients who have had an allergy or bad reaction to somatropin or any of the other ingredients in GENOTROPIN. In the event of an allergic reaction, seek prompt medical attention.

Some patients have developed diabetes mellitus while taking GENOTROPIN. Dosage of diabetes medicines may need to be adjusted during growth hormone treatment. Patients should be watched carefully if growth hormone is given along with glucocorticoid therapy and/or other drugs that are processed by the body in the same way.

In childhood cancer survivors, treatment with growth hormone may increase the risk of a new tumor, particularly certain benign brain tumors. This risk may be higher in patients who were treated with cranial radiation. Also, patients and their doctors should check regularly for skin changes.

A small number of patients treated with growth hormone have had increased pressure in the brain. This can cause headaches and problems with vision. Treatment should be stopped and reassessed in these patients. Patients with Turner syndrome and Prader-Willi syndrome may be at higher risk of developing increased pressure in the brain.

Thyroid function should be checked regularly during growth hormone therapy. Thyroid hormone replacement therapy should be started or adjusted if needed.

Patients treated with growth hormone should be checked regularly for low serum cortisol levels and/or the need to increase the dose of the glucocorticoids they are taking.

In children experiencing rapid growth, curvature of the spine may develop or worsen. This is also called scoliosis. Patients with scoliosis should be checked regularly to make sure their scoliosis does not get worse during their growth hormone therapy.

In children experiencing rapid growth, limping or hip or knee pain may occur. If a child getting growth hormone therapy starts to limp or gets hip or knee pain, the child’s doctor should be notified and the child should be examined.

Growth hormone should only be used during pregnancy if clearly needed. It should be used with caution in nursing mothers because it is not known whether growth hormone is passed into human milk.

Use a different place on the body each day for growth hormone injections. This can help to prevent skin problems such as lumpiness or soreness.

Some cases of pancreatitis (inflamed pancreas) have been reported rarely in children and adults receiving growth hormone. There is some evidence that there is a greater risk of this in children than in adults. Literature suggests that girls who have Turner syndrome may have a greater risk of pancreatitis than other children taking growth hormone. In any child who develops lasting, severe abdominal pain, pancreatitis should be considered.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in children with GHD, side effects included injection site reactions, such as pain, redness/swelling, inflammation, bleeding, scarring, lumps, or rash. Other side effects were fat loss, headache, blood in the urine, low thyroid activity, and mildly increased blood sugar.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in children born SGA, side effects included temporarily elevated blood sugar, increased pressure in the brain, early puberty, abnormal jaw growth, injection site reactions, growth of moles, and worsening of scoliosis (curvature of the spine).

Deaths have been reported with the use of growth hormone in children with Prader-Willi syndrome. These children were extremely overweight, had breathing problems, and/or lung infection. All patients with Prader-Willi syndrome should be examined for these problems. They should also establish healthy weight control.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in children with PWS, side effects included fluid retention, aggressiveness, joint and muscle pain, hair loss, headache, and increased pressure in the brain.

Turner syndrome patients taking growth hormone therapy may be more likely to get ear infections. This is also called otitis media.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in children with Turner syndrome, side effects included flu, throat, ear, or sinus infection, runny nose, joint pain, and urinary tract infection.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in children with ISS, side effects included respiratory illnesses, flu, throat infection, inflammation of the nose and throat, stomach pain, headaches, increased appetite, fever, fracture, mood changes, and joint pain.

Women who are taking estrogen by mouth may take GENOTROPIN. They may need a larger dose of growth hormone.

GENOTROPIN may be taken by the elderly when appropriate. Elderly patients may be more likely to have side effects with growth hormone therapy.

In studies of GENOTROPIN in adults with GHD, side effects included fluid retention, joint or muscle pain, stiffness, and changes in sensation. Usually these side effects did not last long and depended on the dose of GENOTROPIN being taken.

GENOTROPIN cartridges contain m-Cresol and should not be used by patients allergic to it.

A health care provider will help you with the first injection. He or she will also train you on how to inject GENOTROPIN.

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center. Symptoms of overdose may include severe headache, nausea, or vomiting; sudden onset of sweating, fatigue, shakiness, confusion (hypoglycemia); or persistent swelling of hands and feet.

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Laboratory and/or medical tests (e.g., eye exams, thyroid function tests, glucose levels, growth hormone antibody levels) will be done routinely to monitor your response to the medication or check for side effects. Keep all medical appointments and laboratory visits so your therapy can be monitored closely. Consult your doctor for more details.

Missed Dose

It is important to get each dose of this medication as scheduled. If you miss a dose, ask your doctor or pharmacist right away for a new dosing schedule. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Consult the product instructions and your pharmacist for storage details. Keep all medications away from children and pets.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company.Information last revised October 2020. Copyright(c) 2020 First Databank, Inc.

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